Aquaponics & S/H?
Login
User Name
Password   


Registration is FREE. Click to become a member of OrchidBoard community
(You're NOT logged in)

menu menu

Sponsor
Donate Now
and become
Forum Supporter.

Aquaponics & S/H?
Many perks!
<...more...>


Sponsor
 

Google


Fauna Top Sites
LOG IN/REGISTER TO CLOSE THIS ADVERTISEMENT
  #11  
Old 12-05-2020, 10:48 AM
estación seca's Avatar
estación seca estación seca is offline
Senior Member
Aquaponics &amp; S/H?
 

Join Date: Jun 2015
Zone: 9b
Location: Phoenix AZ - Lower Sonoran Desert
Posts: 16,215
Aquaponics &amp; S/H? Male
Default

Before I began humidifying my growing area newly potted S/H plants really struggled before new roots made it to the moist zone. With higher humidity the moist zone is higher, and they adapt faster.
__________________
May the bridges I've burned light my way.

Weather forecast for my neighborhood
Reply With Quote
Post Thanks / Like - 2 Likes
Likes WaterWitchin, harpspiel liked this post
  #12  
Old 12-05-2020, 11:02 AM
WaterWitchin's Avatar
WaterWitchin WaterWitchin is offline
Administrator
 

Join Date: Feb 2011
Zone: 6a
Location: Kansas
Posts: 4,689
Default

I've seen and built similar setups outside in the pond industry, with the seeping rock walls planted and flowing into a pond or basin. I'd use a waterproof backing, silicone or waterfall foam rocks onto the face, using a mix of porous and non-porous rocks. Very do-able.

Google "water wall fountains" and it will give you a lot of ideas for how to construct one.

---------- Post added at 09:02 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:01 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by estación seca View Post
Before I began humidifying my growing area newly potted S/H plants really struggled before new roots made it to the moist zone. With higher humidity the moist zone is higher, and they adapt faster.
Same here. I eventually set up an area for newly potted to SH plants with a timed mister. It really made the transition a LOT quicker.
__________________
Caveat: Everything suggested is based on my environment and culture. Please adjust accordingly.
Reply With Quote
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Likes
Likes harpspiel liked this post
  #13  
Old 12-05-2020, 11:15 AM
harpspiel harpspiel is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Zone: 6b
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 216
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterWitchin View Post
I've seen and built similar setups outside in the pond industry, with the seeping rock walls planted and flowing into a pond or basin. I'd use a waterproof backing, silicone or waterfall foam rocks onto the face, using a mix of porous and non-porous rocks. Very do-able.

Google "water wall fountains" and it will give you a lot of ideas for how to construct one.
Maybe I’ll need a grow-out tank, I’ll think about that.

I hang out on Dendroboard, and they have a few main techniques for creating lightweight sculptural back drops. I have used the Great Stuff technique a few times now, but for this build I’m intending to try the board foam technique. You use layered foam boards, covered in concrete or some kind of waterproof paint. Once done, it can look like very realistic rock, but it isn’t porous at all so I’d have to take that into account.

Here’s an example of one made for an aquarium:
https://www.instructables.com/3D-Aquarium-Background/

I would do mine vertically, with a network of channels for the water to follow and some pockets for larger plants. I want a Nepenthes up by the top, that will need a larger pot. Then have the floating S/H pots right down by the bottom, with some orchids and some cascading plants trailing over the side of the tank. I’m thinking a 20g tank with a 2’ wide x 4’ tall drip wall above it. I suspect that if I run the drip wall in shorter increments frequently, it will mostly water the highest plants (Nepenthes, some lithophytic pinguiculas) whereas running it for an hour once or twice a week will soak everything on the wall, so I can grow plants with a variety of moisture requirements.

Not sure yet whether having the drip wall drip into the tank is a bad idea - if it does I could have it flood the S/H pots which is probably a good thing. Then the tank would need an overflow into a reservoir, and the reservoir would pull water for the drip wall with some kind of filter, which would act as the tank’s filtration system. I would need to do occasional water changes and refresh with RO water.

Last edited by harpspiel; 12-05-2020 at 01:35 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-05-2020, 01:12 PM
Ray's Avatar
Ray Ray is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: May 2005
Member of:AOS
Location: Oak Island NC
Posts: 14,115
Aquaponics &amp; S/H? Male
Default

If the water level in the tank is low enough that the walls can trap some of the humidity around the pots and plants, you'll be unlikely to have sever humidity-gradient issues.
__________________
Ray Barkalow, Orchid Iconoclast
FIRSTRAYS.COM
Try Kelpak - you won't be sorry!
Reply With Quote
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Likes
Likes harpspiel liked this post
  #15  
Old 12-05-2020, 07:06 PM
harpspiel harpspiel is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2009
Zone: 6b
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 216
Default

That’s a good point, and while I don’t think I’d like the look of the water level a few inches down in the tank, I could extend the drip wall to have an enclosure for the S/H pots.

So excited about this build! I asked my partner to think of a space in our small house where it would fit, and we can’t think of anywhere, so it may have to wait.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 12-06-2020, 10:43 PM
Selmo's Avatar
Selmo Selmo is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2015
Zone: 5b
Location: West Central Missouri
Posts: 369
Aquaponics &amp; S/H? Male
Default

The thing with doing orchids and planted aquariums. Is what is the priority, orchids or the aquarium. The light requirements are completely different for each one. Aquarium plants take much higher light than most orchids take, minus maybe vandas. If the aquarium plants are the priority, then you’ll have to provide some shade for the orchids. It will take a little experimentation to get the light balance right for both.
If orchids are the priority, then set up the aquarium as you would a normal fish tank. You have to remember that orchids like to be wet then dry. Not wet continuously, they need some dry time. If you use the one of the hydroponic techniques, where you bubble the aquarium water and suspend the orchid roots in the mist of bubbles. The roots stay moist, not wet. You will need a few fish on the aquarium or else you’ll only be humidifing the roots , no nutrients.
Good luck with this project, interested in how it goes. Keep us posted and updated with photos.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
fertilizer, fish, orchids, s/h, tank


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
A new semi aquaponics system? Chris102 Semi-Hydroponic Culture 10 03-21-2017 12:27 PM
Aquaponics. Let's do this thing! rosemadder Advanced Discussion 26 05-03-2014 11:25 PM
Home aquaponics kit - possible use for orchids? escualida Semi-Hydroponic Culture 13 04-26-2013 11:48 PM
Orchids in Aquaponics Setups? epiphyte0 Semi-Hydroponic Culture 5 05-02-2012 07:58 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:46 PM.

© 2007 OrchidBoard.com
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.37 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2023 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2023 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

Clubs vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.