Mostly dead roots (Phrag, Oncidium, Cattleya, Laelia, Maxilaria)
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  #11  
Old 08-09-2022, 04:47 PM
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@Fishbox - Contact C&C Orchids on Facebook, or email them and pick up a bottle of Kelpak. Not only does it stimulate the growth of new roots, it acts as a "plant IV", giving the plants a boost to sustain them while they are recovering and accelerates the overall process.
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  #12  
Old 08-09-2022, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty Ol' Man View Post
For those roots with obviously rotting g velamin )dark and mushy) simply strip the rotting g material off the root string with a gentle tug. This eliminates most of the material which could promote further rot. The root string, as ES stated, may still take up water, AND will help stabilize the plant in the pot.
This is one more important reason to leave roots intact even if the velamin is bad. When a plant does start to put out new roots, those tender little green tips are very fragile, and it is vital that the plant not wobble because that can damage them. Even those old, bare, stringy roots can help keep the plant stable.

Personally, I hardly ever cut roots. If they separate from the plant with a gentle tug, then that's fine. But if they're firmly attached they still can benefit the plant. And normal roots of Paphs and Phrags are, as was pointed out above, often brown and fuzzy and soft.
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  #13  
Old 08-09-2022, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Dusty Ol' Man View Post
For those roots with obviously rotting g velamin )dark and mushy) simply strip the rotting g material off the root string with a gentle tug. This eliminates most of the material which could promote further rot. The root string, as ES stated, may still take up water, AND will help stabilize the plant in the pot.
Crazy that this isn't more commonly available information!
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  #14  
Old 08-09-2022, 08:50 PM
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Crazy that this isn't more commonly available information!
I learned it from the fine people on this forum. I've seen so much bad advice and information that just isn't true on sites like Facebook and reddit that I just don't want to look anymore. It is very frustrating. But why look anywhere else when you have so many decades of experience, success, and failures to draw from right here?
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  #15  
Old 08-10-2022, 04:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Dusty Ol' Man View Post
I learned it from the fine people on this forum. I've seen so much bad advice and information that just isn't true on sites like Facebook and reddit that I just don't want to look anymore. It is very frustrating. But why look anywhere else when you have so many decades of experience, success, and failures to draw from right here?
So weird how this applies to some hobbies so heavily, while other hobbies enjoy great support and widespread knowledge and accessibility through online contributions. No wonder orchids have a reputation for being so difficult.
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  #16  
Old 08-10-2022, 04:34 PM
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So weird how this applies to some hobbies so heavily, while other hobbies enjoy great support and widespread knowledge and accessibility through online contributions. No wonder orchids have a reputation for being so difficult.
A challenge in giving orchid advice is the fact that there are so many kinds of orchids, with different needs, and so many different growing conditions that people have. So the "why" for any bit of advice is vital so that it can be applied in the correct context. And lots of people are into giving - or asking for - short answers that might be right some of the time, but are wrong more of the time.
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  #17  
Old 08-10-2022, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Roberta View Post
A challenge in giving orchid advice is the fact that there are so many kinds of orchids, with different needs, and so many different growing conditions that people have. So the "why" for any bit of advice is vital so that it can be applied in the correct context. And lots of people are into giving - or asking for - short answers that might be right some of the time, but are wrong more of the time.
Yes. And many of then want to repeat the faulty advice they heard from somewhere without doing any fact checking. Lazy advisors are often poor advisors.
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  #18  
Old 08-10-2022, 07:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roberta View Post
A challenge in giving orchid advice is the fact that there are so many kinds of orchids, with different needs, and so many different growing conditions that people have. So the "why" for any bit of advice is vital so that it can be applied in the correct context. And lots of people are into giving - or asking for - short answers that might be right some of the time, but are wrong more of the time.
So true, and that's one issue that I noticed. Everything out there is generalized advice. If you're lucky, maybe it's for a genus, but there can still be plenty of diversity within a given genus (and I'm sure orchids are no exception).

So what would be a recommended way to begin accumulating well-informed insight and knowledge, without over-relying on this community to get me over the learning curve? Recommended reading?

I would like to someday reach a level of competency to be 'comfortable' and at-home with orchids.
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  #19  
Old 08-10-2022, 08:00 PM
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I totally recommend the American Orchid Society Guide to Orchids and their Culture
It has a lot of material on the general concepts (the "whys") and then has lots of detail by genus and groups within genera. Again, lots and lots of "why" and "how" information. I have been growing orchids for a long time, with some success (and a lot of trial and error) and still find lots of information in the book that that is very helpful. Also beautiful photos, lots and lots of examples. If you don't already own it, buy it! I can't think of any other publication that has so much good stuff in it.
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  #20  
Old 08-11-2022, 06:18 AM
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I second Roberta's book recommendation. Cultural information is given for a very large number of orchids, with symbols used in a table to save space. It is very easy to understand.
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