Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum
Login
User Name
Password   


Registration is FREE. Click to become a member of OrchidBoard community
(You're NOT logged in)

menu menu

Sponsor
Donate Now
and become
Forum Supporter.

Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum
Many perks!
<...more...>


Sponsor
 

Google


Fauna Top Sites
LOG IN/REGISTER TO CLOSE THIS ADVERTISEMENT
  #1  
Old 08-24-2019, 08:02 PM
ArronOB ArronOB is online now
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Central Coast, NSW
Posts: 185
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Male
Default Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum

Hi. Iíve typically grown my cattleya and Oncidium alliance plants in bark, in mesh pots - my aim being to maximise airflow around the roots.

Today I repotted some tiny cattleya hybrid plants which have been growing in pure sphagnum moss, which is fairly tightly compacted into plain plastic pots. Their root growth is amazing! Itís got me wondering. Itís even more amazing because they have been growing indoors over winter in a west facing window (nb. Southern hemisphere) so conditions are harsh. They alternate between being adequately hydrated to bone dry on a cycle of about 3 days. It still hasnít stopped them.

So Iím wondering, what has been peoples experiences growing these two alliances in pure sphagnum?

Cheers
Arron

Ps. I know thereís lots about this subject on the web, but I ask here because I want the opinion of people I trust.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-25-2019, 12:48 AM
wisdomseeker wisdomseeker is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Feb 2018
Member of:AOS
Location: SE USA
Posts: 114
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Male
Default

Decided to take a brief break from my weekend plant chores, and stumbled upon your post.

I was just beginning the process of re-potting a mini Lc. cross (that had been growing in sphagnum) into a mesh pot, using bark as the growing medium. I too have had good results with root growth. My routine has been similar to yours... a cycle of being hydrated to bone dry, in about 3-4 days.

I'm low on sphagnum at the moment (saving what I do have on hand to re-moss a couple of mounts), so I will continue to re-pot this one in bark - but now you have me thinking to myself: if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

__________________
"The glory of the garden lies in more than meets the eye" ~ Rudyard Kipling
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-25-2019, 01:24 AM
AnonYMouse's Avatar
AnonYMouse AnonYMouse is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Jun 2012
Zone: 9b
Location: SF Bay Area, CA
Posts: 2,226
Default

It's not my choice of media but I do have a couple of plants in sphag. One was a tiny division of a Liparis and the other is a Neo I was too lazy to repot after acquiring.

There is nothing wrong with growing in sphag moss. Commercial growers do it very successfully.

The downside is their longevity. I choose other media because I hate repotting!
__________________
Anon Y Mouse

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." Hanlonís Razor

I am not being argumentative. I am correcting you!

LoL Since when is science an opinion?

Last edited by AnonYMouse; 08-25-2019 at 01:26 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-25-2019, 02:20 AM
SouthPark's Avatar
SouthPark SouthPark is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2018
Member of:AOS
Location: Australia
Posts: 458
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Male
Default

It will definitely work. At the moment, I only grow Fdk plants in fairly tightly bound spaghnum in plastic pot, with the spaghnum surrounded underneath and around the sides with scoria.

As Anonymouse mentioned - one possible drawback is longevity.

But if it works very well for your area and for you, it's definitely good to stay with it. As long as the growth parameters stay properly controlled, which you appear to be getting correct, then that's excellent.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-25-2019, 02:37 AM
AnonYMouse's Avatar
AnonYMouse AnonYMouse is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Jun 2012
Zone: 9b
Location: SF Bay Area, CA
Posts: 2,226
Default

Other superficial reasons I dislike sphag:

Looks like a pile of isopods
smell
dust

...
__________________
Anon Y Mouse

"Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity." Hanlonís Razor

I am not being argumentative. I am correcting you!

LoL Since when is science an opinion?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-25-2019, 08:30 AM
Ray's Avatar
Ray Ray is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Oak Island NC
Posts: 10,340
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Male
Default

When I had a greenhouse with close to a thousand plants in it, my media assortment included probably everything you can think of, plus maybe a few you haven't. Now that I'm back to being a windowsill grower, it's either LECA in S/H culture or sphagnum.

Yes, it has a short lifespan, but if you replace it regularly, it's easy to do. I don't think it has a bad odor at all, but maybe that varies. It IS, to some degree, naturally fungicidal, too.

I'm going to begin another thread on a related subject, so as to avoid hijacking this one.
__________________
Ray Barkalow, Orchid Iconoclast
Want Better Plants? READ THIS
shop.firstrays.com

Free Shipping in the US! (see terms & conditions for details)

Last edited by Ray; 08-25-2019 at 06:01 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-25-2019, 05:46 PM
ArronOB ArronOB is online now
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Central Coast, NSW
Posts: 185
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Male
Default

Major negative not mentioned is cost - although it may be more affordable elsewhere.

Another neg is it will require a different watering regime to the bark-potted plants, which my Growing situation doesnít really allow.

Cheers, and thanks for the reply
Arron
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-25-2019, 06:30 PM
SouthPark's Avatar
SouthPark SouthPark is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2018
Member of:AOS
Location: Australia
Posts: 458
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Male
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArronOB View Post
Major negative not mentioned is cost - although it may be more affordable elsewhere.
Orchid growing of sought-after prize orchids is a costly affair. This is an accepted negative.

Of course, I'm just kidding! You're right. Relative cost is a consideration here.

Also agree with the watering regime. This is why I have been staying with volcanic rock for most of my big-enough catts, dend, paphs, angraecum, oncid, and vanda. I can just water them almost every morning - just watering the surface. Some grow fully outdoor, most growing semi-outdoor (patio roof, but still gets most of sun coming through - although I do move certain plants into more protected spots - ones noticed to not handle the light as well as others).

I water nearly every morning. Every few days or so, I will give a full day break in watering - to allow the volcanic rock media to get dry, or quite dry. This likely helps with cutting down on unwanted issues occurring inside the pot.

I can definitely understand that making best use of water can be important. So I'm all for just keep going with what works - this includes using pure spaghnum.

As always, the growth method is a choice, and factors will include just choice itself, with some other things like number of plants we grow, types of plants, watering/fertilising regime, cost, part of the world we live in etc.

I think it's quite awesome how a lot of orchids can adapt to or handle certain kinds of media that growers aren't shown or taught that could be used. The growing of catts and other orchids in tightly bundled spaghnum is definitely workable.

Last edited by SouthPark; 08-26-2019 at 02:58 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-25-2019, 06:44 PM
Roberta's Avatar
Roberta Roberta is offline
Senior Member
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum
 

Join Date: Jun 2008
Zone: 10a
Location: Coastal southern California, USA
Posts: 2,790
Growing Cattleyas in pure sphagnum Female
Default

Since it's all about meeting the objective of a wet-dry cycle, sphag is as good as any other medium if that's what the plant gets. So no surprise that it can work on Catts, especially little ones. In a larger pot it tends to stay wet for too long. But the little ones dry out fast. I use it for lots of things in baskets - again, watering frequency and air movement allow the plants to dry out. An advantage, especially in net pots (plastic baskets) - it doesn't fall out of the holes the way bark tends to do. So, no reason not to use it just because you're potting Catts... You just may have to approach watering a bit differently than you would if it were bark to get the same effect.
__________________
"Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence" Carl Sagan

Roberta's Orchids
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
amazing, growing, pure, sphagnum, wondering


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Growing Cattleyas under PAR38 Mor Growing Under Lights 43 02-18-2015 09:45 AM
Phal with no spike, but has a root that won't stop growing Chani Beginner Discussion 21 02-04-2015 10:31 PM
New to the board, need advice on miniature and compact cattleyas SoCalOrchidGirl Beginner Discussion 6 06-10-2014 08:44 AM
Orchids Growing Out of Control!!! PhalinVA Beginner Discussion 16 04-26-2013 11:32 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:27 AM.

© 2007 OrchidBoard.com
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.37 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

Clubs vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.