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  #1  
Unread 05-07-2005, 12:03 PM
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Join Date: May 2005
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Default Scaly Bugs

How doesone get rid of scaly bugs from orchids and other plants? I've tried the rubbing alcohol trick, but they always seem to come back. Any other ideas? Flame thrower?
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  #2  
Unread 05-08-2005, 08:53 PM
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Well, a flame thrower would probably get rid of the scale, but...perhaps a less radical solution would be imidacloprid. That is, of course provided that the plant is not currently in a vivarium housing animals. I've found that imidacloprid (merit) is the best thing for scale, mealies, and other sucking homopterans.
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  #3  
Unread 05-09-2005, 06:11 AM
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No there is no animals there. Where is imidacloprid available? Is this a specialized product or "over the counter" pesticide ? How do you apply it ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by eukaryote
Well, a flame thrower would probably get rid of the scale, but...perhaps a less radical solution would be imidacloprid. That is, of course provided that the plant is not currently in a vivarium housing animals. I've found that imidacloprid (merit) is the best thing for scale, mealies, and other sucking homopterans.
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  #4  
Unread 05-09-2005, 12:38 PM
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You should be able to get it at most garden supply places. It goes under the name merit, and it is sold in a spray and a concentrate. Just look for imidacloprid in the ingredients.
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  #5  
Unread 05-14-2005, 08:08 AM
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Default Scaly Bugs

I hate using pesticides on my plants or in my greenhouse but after the first year in my tropical world, I had a good length of nude plants. I hand picked for hours every day. I gave up. I now use very sparingly, whatever works. I locate the plant in a special spraying corner where it stays for a few days waiting for respray.Then they get a good shower before they go back to thier origional place. At any hint of a bug and out comes the spray. I have a pond with waterfall in one end of the greenhouse with koi in it so I do have to be careful about killing them.
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  #6  
Unread 05-18-2005, 11:56 PM
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Barb,I would be very careful with the fish as most commercial pesticides are deadly to them, even trace amounts. If you have a fan in your greenhouse, make sure its off before spraying, as overspray drifts much farther then you might think. Even a wind of 5 mph can carry overspray up to a mile away.

As for scale, depending on the size of the outbreak and the value of what is infected, it is sometimes better to just cull infested plants. I would say that a good rule of thumb is if the infestation is less than 10 percent of your collection (say 1 of your 10 orchids has scale) it will be cheaper and less time consuming in the long run to remove the plant/plants from your collection. As you have already experienced, the little suckers are hard to get rid of, even pesticides don't usually wipe them totally out.

My suggestion is to get rid of the plant if it doesn't hold any emotional value, and monitor the uninfested plants very closely, summer is fast approaching and its pest breeding season :cry:
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  #7  
Unread 05-19-2005, 09:17 AM
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Default Scaly Bugs

Yes I have about 8 fans in the greenhouse. I leave the ones on in the roof peek and turn all ground ones off. I have also zebra and gould finches and a very very rare catfish in there. On the other end of the greenhouse from the pond. So far all had worked out fine with my spraying. I use mild pesticides and usually put the plants being sprayed on the floor in a special spot for a few days or week, then, before I put them back I shower them with water for a rinse. Funny thing, I have more problems with bug in the winter more than in summer. Probably mostly because I have a jungle and can't monitor everything that is hidden in back corners. Barb Yahoo IM waretrop
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  #8  
Unread 06-04-2005, 10:54 AM
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Imidacloprid is a good one for general knock-down, and it's not too environmentally unfriendly. You might want to read more about it:

http://extoxnet.orst.edu/pips/imidaclo.htm

Another alternative to a pure "poison" is an insect growth regulator, kinoprene, which is available as Enstarr II on the market.

The big advantage of an IGR over a poison is that there can be no resistence development, as with poisons. Picture this: you spray with poisons, and most of the insects are killed. Their larvae might be, and their eggs are probably untouched. However, the exposure to the toxin might develop a change in the genetics of the survivors that leads to resistance to the poison, and we're left with hard-to-kill super bugs that can pass those traits onto their offspring.

An IGR, by contrast, prevents the insects - in all stages - from maturing. No maturation = no offspring = no resistance and eventual death.

I prefer a multi-prong approach, so when I see an outbreak of something, usually coming in with new plants, I spray the entire collection with a poison (I use Orthene), and IGR (Enstar II) and an antifeedant (neem oil plus liquid soap to emulsify it) all at once. The poison kills most of the adults, the IGR prevents the maturation of more of them, and the antifeedant discourages migration to other plants. Repeat that weekly for three treatments, and you'd be amazed at the effectiveness.

DO NOT spray insecticides as a preventive treatment, as that's where most resistance is developed. IGR's on the other hand, may be used that way with no issue, and the neem oil is a good, general repellant that's also a leaf shine!
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  #9  
Unread 06-05-2005, 09:32 AM
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Ray, those are great tips. It's much appreciated !

Last edited by Marty; 04-11-2006 at 11:09 AM..
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  #10  
Unread 06-15-2005, 08:44 PM
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Default Kinoprene

I have 3 plants with mealy bugs. Nasty critters! Is kinoprene, (Enstarr II) available in Canada?
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