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  #1  
Unread 04-14-2008, 12:39 AM
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Default Let's Play "Name That Orchid"!!

Welcome to the wonderful new game show, "Name That Orchid" where contestants identify orchids not by the flowers but by photos of raggedy rescue orchids and a brief description. "What are the fabulous prizes?" you ask. Why, the greatest prize of all: the orchids don't die (because I will finally know what they are and therefore can find out how to properly care for them )!

Orchid number one has disk shaped pseudobulbs and single leaves measuring three to four inches. It has taken quite well to its new home on cork bark chunk.

The second orchid came to me with bare steeple-like pseudobulbs four to five inches inches tall and has a massive root system composed of dozens of multibranched roots that seem right at home in a basket of sphagnum moss.

Number three is an unhappy little fellow composed of stacking, flattened footballs topped with single "blades of grass" between seven and ten inches long.

The fourth orchid in question is a vanda which is supposed to bloom with large purple flowers that smell lightly of camphor (moth balls). It also has a genetic predisposition toward leaves that flop to the sides.

Finally we have a huge oncidium (that green thing sitting in the right foreground is a one gallon watering can) that sends out three to four foot long spikes covered in fifty to one hundred flowers each. The flowers are reported to smell of lemon and vanilla in either the evening or early morning.
contestants and thanks for the help!!!
Attached Thumbnails
Let's Play "Name That Orchid"!!-orchid-1.jpg   Let's Play "Name That Orchid"!!-orchid-2.jpg   Let's Play "Name That Orchid"!!-orchid-3.jpg   Let's Play "Name That Orchid"!!-orchid-4.jpg   Let's Play "Name That Orchid"!!-orchid-5.jpg  

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  #2  
Unread 04-14-2008, 01:13 AM
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Hi Aaron, Here are guesses for the first three! 1. Could be Den. aggregatum, 2. A Lycaste or Catesetum and 3. Possibly Maxillaria tennufolia. No idea on the last two! I'll be interested to read what others think.

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  #3  
Unread 04-14-2008, 01:52 AM
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my guesses: 1.- can also be Oncididium, 2.- Catasetinae (I would also say Catasetum, check f it has old spikes growing from the base of the PB!) 3.- no idea, 4.- Vanda, 5.- could be Encyclia.

The problem you have identifying plants without flowers is that many species have a similar habit, and therefore it is almost impossible to be sure what they are based only on vegetative parts. Even botanists need a flower to identify most of the plants, as the identification of plants is based on the reproductive (flowers and sexual organs) and not on the vegetative parts!
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  #4  
Unread 04-14-2008, 02:24 AM
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I can't tell if orchid number two had flower spikes growing from the base for sure but I think it may have. There are small (1/4") spiky protrusions at the base however.
I know species ID is nearly impossible without flowers but even knowing the genus would help with orchids one, two, and three. Orchid four may not make it so I would love to be able to replace it for my brother in law if it dies since its his all time favorite.
If you know much about vandas please check out my posting in the vanda alliance entitled "Operation Vanda Rescue". I could really use some suggestions on how to save this orchid.
Thanks.

Last edited by AaronM; 04-14-2008 at 02:26 AM.. Reason: Misspelling
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  #5  
Unread 04-14-2008, 02:51 AM
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Hi Aaron, plant N° 2 is (almost 100% sure of it) a Catasetinae and most probably a Catasetum. You can follow this instructions for it CULTURE OF CATASETINAE They are actually quite easy to grow, and very nice plants too!

Vanda... not very experiende with the genus...
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  #6  
Unread 04-14-2008, 09:46 AM
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Thanks Kavanaru,
I appreciate the info.
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  #7  
Unread 04-14-2008, 09:55 PM
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At a glance, #5 looks for all the world like Coelogyne cristata - a plant which commonly builds up specimens like the one you have. If it is, it will be a challenge to identify by flower, because it's a challenge to flower. It's hard to tell without a closer look at the pseudobulbs and rhizome though.

Whatever it is - it's a great specimen!
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  #8  
Unread 04-14-2008, 10:12 PM
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no guesses for #1 til i see a better pic. #2 im going to go with ramon. i think its a catasetum. im willing to bet the bank that #3 is max tenufolia. i would love to have a closer look at #5. it strikes me as an oncidium, as none of the coel that i have tend to mound up like that. but who knows and please someone...put that poor vanda out of his misery lol
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  #9  
Unread 04-14-2008, 10:30 PM
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Aaron I think Shirley is right on her guess, Den aggregatum. Mine is in a basket with sphag. moss. I have approx 32 blooms on this one, just opened over the weekend.

Here is some information for you...wish I could thank the source of this info, but that's unknown.

This orchid can be a difficult plant to grow although many growers find it to be their easiest bloomer. If you can make this plant happy, it will grow and bloom in what may be seemingly undesirable conditions.

Natural Growing Conditions
The Dendrobium aggregatum is an epiphyte, that means a plant that grows on another plant but isn't parasitic, hailing from North-East India through Indochina and Thailand. Plants have been found at altitudes of above 500 metres, but can also be grown in warmer to intermediate conditions. The plant is open to a variety of different situations as long as it gets plenty of light, water, and a winter rest.

Characteristics
Pseudobulbs
This plant has short, thick pseudobulbs, thick bulb-like stems that store water. Bulbs are clumped together by the bases and taper slightly to a point near the leaf-bearing end. Pseudobulbs are usually covered with a thin, papery covering called 'sarong' that protects new growth. It is not necessary to remove this covering unless you are worried about an insect, mite, or fungal infection. The pseudobulbs turn reddish with exposure to sun, so you know that they're getting the right amount of sun. Some people say that old, leafless pseudobulbs look like candied dates due to this tinting. If hacking up your plant sounds like a good idea, for whatever reason, make sure that there are five to nine pseudobulbs in each division.

Leaves
The leaves on a Den. aggregatum are short and thick. The leaves are placed singularly at the end of each pseudobulb and have a slight crease down the centre. They tend to be elliptical in shape and slightly flexible, although it isn't recommended that they be flexed unnecessarily. Leaves tend to be a darker green but lighten with exposure to the sun. Yellow leaves aren't a good sign.

Roots
Roots are usually thin and white with a slightly rough texture. Growing tips are translucent and green and are easily damaged, so be careful if you are handling the plant.

Flowers
Den. aggregatum has very delicate flowers of orange or yellow that hang from a thin inflorescence. The inflorescence grows from near the base of the pseudobulbs and usually takes several weeks to develop enough to bloom, which can be agonising for even the most patient of growers. Flowers, if well cared for and kept in high humidity, can last anywhere from a week to a month. The flowers are flat without a pronounced labellum1 and smell faintly of honey. You really have to stick your nose in the flower in order to smell it, but it is most fragrant in the early morning and early evening when there is dim light. In general, ten to twenty flowers will develop on an inflorescence2, although younger plants may have fewer. Inflorescences in this plant do not rebloom and should be cut off after they have dried up and turned brown.

Care
Mounted
This plant grows best mounted due to its epiphytic nature. Usually, a medium such as cork, fern bark, or teak is used. Mounting allows plants to completely dry out between waterings and allows air circulation. Orchids, like people, do not like having 'wet feet.' If you are mounting your orchid yourself, make sure to place a pad of sphagnum moss around the roots to prevent it from drying out too fast. Most people use fishing line to attach the plant, but quilting thread and wire are always handy. These ligatures can be removed once the plant establishes itself by hugging the mount with its roots.

Potted
If potted, a medium that drains quickly and thoroughly should be used. Dendrobiums do not like to have their roots disturbed, so it is best to anchor the plant in a substrate such as lava rock.

Sun Exposure
The Den. aggregatum needs a lot of diffused sunlight3. When pseudobulbs turn a reddish colour, the plant is receiving the most light it can handle and should be left in place unless it starts to sunburn. During the plant's winter rest, the amount of sunlight should be maintained. Some people like to 'blast' their plant with sun during this rest, but the plant is less capable of healing itself if it is cooked. It seems that constant 'blasting' works quite well for making this plant happy.

Watering
For mounted plants, a lot of water is necessary. This, of course, is dependent on the atmospheric humidity and the temperature. The plant should not dry out. Potted plants should be allowed to completely dry out after watering. In a well-drained medium, this should take no more than a day or two. Orchids are very sensitive to excessive salinity; so, if water is being processed through a softener or has large quantities of minerals, distilled rainwater (also dependent on area conditions), or reverse osmosified (R/O) water should be used.

Fertilising
Fertilisation, while not necessary, should be done regularly. Plants should not be fertilised more than once a week in any circumstances. Fertiliser should not be given to ailing plants or plants with dry roots. Fertilising a plant with dry roots can lead to burnt roots, which is never very nice. Some growers use bloom boosters, though they have not been proven to aid in flower production.

Winter Rest
Den. aggregatum requires a winter rest period. For several months, the plant should be exposed to 10-15°C temperatures at night with slightly warmer days. The plants can take a light frost, but it is not recommended. Watering should be gradually withdrawn and fertilising completely stopped. Plants should be watered very sparingly throughout the rest period if the pseudobulbs show extensive shrivelling. Some shrinkage should not be alarming and plants may be partially deciduous. Sun exposure should remain the same from the growth period through the rest period in order to ensure spring blooms and growth.

1 A pronounced lip, or third petal on orchid flowers.
2 A long spike that flowers are arranged along.
3 Bright, indirect light.

This will give you an idea of what it will look like.

Sue if you read this, do you still have your friends den that you took a photo of last year at your orchid society meeting. It was so huge and phenomenal blooms goin' on.
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  #10  
Unread 04-15-2008, 01:52 AM
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I tend to disagree with the first plant being Dendrobum aggregatum. If you look closer at the PB, den Aggreg has more or less cigar-shaped PBs, while the plant in Pic 1 has round flat PBs.
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