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  #1  
Old 05-17-2007, 09:00 AM
TOMD TOMD is offline
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Default Dendrobium aggreatum majus


Hello all, Received my new plant yesterday ordered it from Oak Hill Gardens came in great condition.Dendrobium aggreatum majus would like some advice. this is my first mounted plant. what is the best way to water it and how often and how much light does it need and also how often to feed it. all of my other plats are in pots,. Thanks for the advice. TOMD

Last edited by TOMD; 05-17-2007 at 09:03 AM.. Reason: added new words
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  #2  
Old 05-21-2007, 03:14 PM
lore_tex lore_tex is offline
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Dendrobium aggreatum majus Female
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Hi there, I'm not an expert on mounted plants, but for my mounted dendrobium (outside), I lightly shower (or heavily mist) it with water every morning and it is positioned to receive bright filtered light for a little over half a day and shade the rest of the day. However, it depends a bit on where you live. I'm not sure where you're at. Mine needs a bit more shade since I'm in Texas. And when it gets so hot in the summer, I water it at sun up and at sun down.
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  #3  
Old 05-21-2007, 03:30 PM
TOMD TOMD is offline
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Thanks, lore_tex i live in SouthCarolina and we have very hot weather here. it in the high 80,s now and pretty humid.dont get to much shade no trees so i am afraid to put it outside. I have it in my green House covered with shade cloth and a misting system. do you think it would be better to put it in a pot. TOMD
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  #4  
Old 05-21-2007, 07:34 PM
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justatypn justatypn is offline
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Suggestively they love to be mounted. This orchid can be a difficult plant to grow although many growers find it to be their easiest bloomer. If you can make this plant happy, it will grow and bloom in what may be seemingly undesirable conditions. Here is a cut and paste that should be most helpful...

Natural Growing Conditions
The Dendrobium aggregatum is an epiphyte, that means a plant that grows on another plant but isn't parasitic, hailing from North-East India through Indochina and Thailand. Plants have been found at altitudes of above 500 meters, but can also be grown in warmer to intermediate conditions. The plant is open to a variety of different situations as long as it gets plenty of light, water, and a winter rest.
Characteristics
Pseudobulbs
This plant has short, thick pseudobulbs, thick bulb-like stems that store water. Bulbs are clumped together by the bases and taper slightly to a point near the leaf-bearing end. Pseudobulbs are usually covered with a thin, papery covering called 'sarong' that protects new growth. It is not necessary to remove this covering unless you are worried about an insect, mite, or fungal infection. The pseudobulbs turn reddish with exposure to sun, so you know that they're getting the right amount of sun. Some people say that old, leafless pseudobulbs look like candied dates due to this tinting. If hacking up your plant sounds like a good idea, for whatever reason, make sure that there are five to nine pseudobulbs in each division.
Leaves
The leaves on a Den. aggregatum are short and thick. The leaves are placed singularly at the end of each pseudobulb and have a slight crease down the center. They tend to be elliptical in shape and slightly flexible, although it isn't recommended that they be flexed unnecessarily. Leaves tend to be a darker green but lighten with exposure to the sun. Yellow leaves aren't a good sign.
Roots
Roots are usually thin and white with a slightly rough texture. Growing tips are translucent and green and are easily damaged, so be careful if you are handling the plant.
Flowers
Den. aggregatum has very delicate flowers of orange or yellow that hang from a thin inflorescence. The inflorescence grows from near the base of the pseudobulbs and usually takes several weeks to develop enough to bloom, which can be agonizing for even the most patient of growers. Flowers, if well cared for and kept in high humidity, can last anywhere from a week to a month. The flowers are flat without a pronounced labium and smell faintly of honey. You really have to stick your nose in the flower in order to smell it, but it is most fragrant in the early morning and early evening when there is dim light. In general, ten to twenty flowers will develop on an inflorescence, although younger plants may have fewer. Inflorescences in this plant do not re bloom and should be cut off after they have dried up and turned brown.
Care
Mounted
This plant grows best mounted due to its epiphytic nature. Usually, a medium such as cork, fern bark, or teak is used. Mounting allows plants to completely dry out between waterings and allows air circulation. Orchids, like people, do not like having 'wet feet.' If you are mounting your orchid yourself, make sure to place a pad of sphagnum moss around the roots to prevent it from drying out too fast. Most people use fishing line to attach the plant, but quilting thread and wire are always handy. These ligatures can be removed once the plant establishes itself by hugging the mount with its roots.
Potted
If potted, a medium that drains quickly and thoroughly should be used. Dendrobiums do not like to have their roots disturbed, so it is best to anchor the plant in a substrate such as lava rock.
Sun Exposure
The Den. aggregatum needs a lot of diffused sunlight. When pseudobulbs turn a reddish color, the plant is receiving the most light it can handle and should be left in place unless it starts to sunburn. During the plant's winter rest, the amount of sunlight should be maintained. Some people like to 'blast' their plant with sun during this rest, but the plant is less capable of healing itself if it is cooked. It seems that constant 'blasting' works quite well for making this plant happy.
Watering
For mounted plants, a lot of water is necessary. This, of course, is dependent on the atmospheric humidity and the temperature. The plant should not dry out. Potted plants should be allowed to completely dry out after watering. In a well-drained medium, this should take no more than a day or two. Orchids are very sensitive to excessive salinity; so, if water is being processed through a softener or has large quantities of minerals, distilled rainwater (also dependent on area conditions), or reverse osmosis (R/O) water should be used.
Fertilizing
Fertilization, while not necessary, should be done regularly. Plants should not be fertilized more than once a week in any circumstances. Fertilizer should not be given to ailing plants or plants with dry roots. Fertilizing a plant with dry roots can lead to burnt roots, which is never very nice. Some growers use bloom boosters, though they have not been proven to aid in flower production.
Winter Rest
Den. aggregatum requires a winter rest period. For several months, the plant should be exposed to 10-15°C temperatures at night with slightly warmer days. The plants can take a light frost, but it is not recommended. Watering should be gradually withdrawn and fertilizing completely stopped. Plants should be watered very sparingly throughout the rest period if the pseudobulbs show extensive shriveling. Some shrinkage should not be alarming and plants may be partially deciduous. Sun exposure should remain the same from the growth period through the rest period in order to ensure spring blooms and growth.
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Cheryl

“Respect does not come from the work you do, it comes from the way you do your work.”

Last edited by justatypn; 05-21-2007 at 07:34 PM.. Reason: OMG server over-load
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  #5  
Old 05-22-2007, 09:40 AM
TOMD TOMD is offline
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Justatypn, Thank you so much for the reply it was very well explainded and i will follow your advice.thanks again you hve been most helpful. TOMD
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  #6  
Old 05-28-2007, 11:28 AM
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Orchonubee Orchonubee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by justatypn View Post
Suggestively they love to be mounted. This orchid can be a difficult plant to grow although many growers find it to be their easiest bloomer. If you can make this plant happy, it will grow and bloom in what may be seemingly undesirable conditions. Here is a cut and paste that should be most helpful...

Natural Growing Conditions
The Dendrobium aggregatum is an epiphyte, that means a plant that grows on another plant but isn't parasitic, hailing from North-East India through Indochina and Thailand. Plants have been found at altitudes of above 500 meters, but can also be grown in warmer to intermediate conditions. The plant is open to a variety of different situations as long as it gets plenty of light, water, and a winter rest.
Characteristics
Pseudobulbs
This plant has short, thick pseudobulbs, thick bulb-like stems that store water. Bulbs are clumped together by the bases and taper slightly to a point near the leaf-bearing end. Pseudobulbs are usually covered with a thin, papery covering called 'sarong' that protects new growth. It is not necessary to remove this covering unless you are worried about an insect, mite, or fungal infection. The pseudobulbs turn reddish with exposure to sun, so you know that they're getting the right amount of sun. Some people say that old, leafless pseudobulbs look like candied dates due to this tinting. If hacking up your plant sounds like a good idea, for whatever reason, make sure that there are five to nine pseudobulbs in each division.
Leaves
The leaves on a Den. aggregatum are short and thick. The leaves are placed singularly at the end of each pseudobulb and have a slight crease down the center. They tend to be elliptical in shape and slightly flexible, although it isn't recommended that they be flexed unnecessarily. Leaves tend to be a darker green but lighten with exposure to the sun. Yellow leaves aren't a good sign.
Roots
Roots are usually thin and white with a slightly rough texture. Growing tips are translucent and green and are easily damaged, so be careful if you are handling the plant.
Flowers
Den. aggregatum has very delicate flowers of orange or yellow that hang from a thin inflorescence. The inflorescence grows from near the base of the pseudobulbs and usually takes several weeks to develop enough to bloom, which can be agonizing for even the most patient of growers. Flowers, if well cared for and kept in high humidity, can last anywhere from a week to a month. The flowers are flat without a pronounced labium and smell faintly of honey. You really have to stick your nose in the flower in order to smell it, but it is most fragrant in the early morning and early evening when there is dim light. In general, ten to twenty flowers will develop on an inflorescence, although younger plants may have fewer. Inflorescences in this plant do not re bloom and should be cut off after they have dried up and turned brown.
Care
Mounted
This plant grows best mounted due to its epiphytic nature. Usually, a medium such as cork, fern bark, or teak is used. Mounting allows plants to completely dry out between waterings and allows air circulation. Orchids, like people, do not like having 'wet feet.' If you are mounting your orchid yourself, make sure to place a pad of sphagnum moss around the roots to prevent it from drying out too fast. Most people use fishing line to attach the plant, but quilting thread and wire are always handy. These ligatures can be removed once the plant establishes itself by hugging the mount with its roots.
Potted
If potted, a medium that drains quickly and thoroughly should be used. Dendrobiums do not like to have their roots disturbed, so it is best to anchor the plant in a substrate such as lava rock.
Sun Exposure
The Den. aggregatum needs a lot of diffused sunlight. When pseudobulbs turn a reddish color, the plant is receiving the most light it can handle and should be left in place unless it starts to sunburn. During the plant's winter rest, the amount of sunlight should be maintained. Some people like to 'blast' their plant with sun during this rest, but the plant is less capable of healing itself if it is cooked. It seems that constant 'blasting' works quite well for making this plant happy.
Watering
For mounted plants, a lot of water is necessary. This, of course, is dependent on the atmospheric humidity and the temperature. The plant should not dry out. Potted plants should be allowed to completely dry out after watering. In a well-drained medium, this should take no more than a day or two. Orchids are very sensitive to excessive salinity; so, if water is being processed through a softener or has large quantities of minerals, distilled rainwater (also dependent on area conditions), or reverse osmosis (R/O) water should be used.
Fertilizing
Fertilization, while not necessary, should be done regularly. Plants should not be fertilized more than once a week in any circumstances. Fertilizer should not be given to ailing plants or plants with dry roots. Fertilizing a plant with dry roots can lead to burnt roots, which is never very nice. Some growers use bloom boosters, though they have not been proven to aid in flower production.
Winter Rest
Den. aggregatum requires a winter rest period. For several months, the plant should be exposed to 10-15°C temperatures at night with slightly warmer days. The plants can take a light frost, but it is not recommended. Watering should be gradually withdrawn and fertilizing completely stopped. Plants should be watered very sparingly throughout the rest period if the pseudobulbs show extensive shriveling. Some shrinkage should not be alarming and plants may be partially deciduous. Sun exposure should remain the same from the growth period through the rest period in order to ensure spring blooms and growth.
Thanx Cheryl, if all the write-ups and replies were this informative, our lives with orchids would be so much better.

I question a previous reply that mentions watering in the eve, and to me evening orchid watering has always been a no no.

Rico
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  #7  
Old 05-28-2007, 03:31 PM
Ross Ross is offline
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Now known as D. lindleyi. The only Dendros I have had success with are mounted. Definintely leave it mounted. It looks best that way and should tolerate daily watering and high heat and humidity best that way. It needs a cool/dry winter rest to bloom well and wants high light and warm weather in growing season (as well as water/fertilizer.) IOSPE PHOTOS
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