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  #1  
Old 11-20-2023, 11:31 AM
alecStewart1 alecStewart1 is offline
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Default Clarifying the Culture for Asian Cymbidiums

Hello friends!

I was looking around the internet the other day because I was curious, but I haven't gotten clear answers for certain aspects about the culture for Asian Cymbidiums so I thought I'd start a thread for discussion.
EDIT: I'm also asking because I'm curious if I can find a good plant this coming Black Friday/Cyber Monday.

A few definitive things I can gather:
  • All Asian Cymbidiums want 40-60% humidity
  • All Cymbidiums, generally, want cool/cold falls winters in order to start blooming near the end of winter.
  • All Cymbidiums want to have their substrate moist but not "have their feet wet" during the growing season.
  • All Cymbidiums prefer bright shade, especially during the growing season
  • I've read Cym. goeringii is a bit more particular about the temp ranges their in than the other species.

The few things I'm not entirely clear on:
  • Are they all cool-intermediate, cool-warm, cold-warm, cold-intermediate, intermediate-warm growers? Or do some species differ slightly?
  • When it comes to substrate, I've seen it's recommneded to use equal parts akadama, chunky perlite, huurga (?), and medium orchid bark. However, I've found this mix from a Canadian vendor and they say the size of substrate should decrease the higher up in the pot. So bottom to top: large -> medium -> small chucks.

Those of you more knowledgeable and wise to these species of Cyms please reply!

EDIT:

Alright after looking around some more, here's some (hopefully) better info.
  • Cym. goeringii are cool-warm growers
  • Cym. ensifolium intermediate/intermediate-warm growers
  • Cym. sinense are cool-intermediate growers
  • There's possibly some wiggle room with the temps, but don't get too crazy
  • All of the Jenosa subtype of Cymbidiums are semi-terrestrial/terrestrial. They have thicker roots that they want to dig down into the medium they're in, which is why tall pots are preferred.
  • Along with the above, these types of Cymbidiums apparently like a more chunky pumice based substrate, with larger bits more towards the bottom of their tall pots. This allows for airflow around the roots.
  • 40-60% humidity is a good range to aim for.
  • Dappled sunlight from a window or edge of the light from a grow light is preferable.
  • To bloom, they require a corresponding change in temps in the non-blooming/growing season. I'll have to look more to clarify those.
  • For Cym. goeringii in order to keep flowers for longer, slightly lower temps are required.
  • A lot of growers experienced with these plants tend to use slow-releasing fertilizers.
  • Depending on where you live and your housing situation, you can get these to grow and bloom indoors. Apparently it's not uncommon in Asian for people to grow them indoors.
  • Water around the plant, avoid pouring water directly on the roots/crown and getting water on the leaves.

Last edited by alecStewart1; 11-21-2023 at 10:49 AM.. Reason: Give better information
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  #2  
Old 11-20-2023, 12:20 PM
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First, if you see "all" anywhere with respect to orchid conditions, move on... there are exceptions to all the rules.

"All" Cyms don't require fall cool-down, they don't "all" bloom in the winter. Lots and lots of exceptions here.
Of the "Asian" Cyms, particularly not true of Cym ensifolium and sinense - they need to be a bit warm, not cold-tolerant at all. (In fact, Cym ensifolium in particular is a very important parent of the late summer/early fall Cyms that don't need that cool-down.) There are other species that also fit in here - the "tropical" hard-leaved Cyms - in that group, most will tolerate some cold, but don't require it or even particularly want it..

So first, get rid of any "all" generalizations. Take a look at what people actually grow in your area, and how they grow them.

---------- Post added at 09:20 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:04 AM ----------

Also, when you say "Asian Cymbidium" are you specifically referring to the small flowered plants with narrow leaves that are grown in the traditional pots for their aesthetics in Japan, Korea and China? The whole genus is native to Asia, Australia, and its nearby islands. The (mostly) large-flowered hybrids that you'll find most commonly, have species such as insigne and lowianaum, etc. in their backgrounds, those do mostly want the fall cool-down to bloom unless they have significant ensifolium, etc. in their background.
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  #3  
Old 11-20-2023, 12:52 PM
alecStewart1 alecStewart1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roberta View Post
Also, when you say "Asian Cymbidium" are you specifically referring to the small flowered plants with narrow leaves that are grown in the traditional pots for their aesthetics in Japan, Korea and China?
Yes. Cym. ensifolium, sinense, goeringii, kanran and faberii.

It seems out of all of them, Cym. ensifolium would be "easiest" to grow in North Texas. I assume the culture regarding weather/temps would be:
  • Bring the plant it when temps start dropping below 50-55
  • Put the plant in bright shade during the spring and summer.

Both Cym. sinense and goeringii seem like they'd do better and indoor plants in my situation, or even a slight reverse of what I'd do for Cym. ensifolium.

The only thing is getting that potting mix I see Asian Cymbidium Empress mention or creating something similar.

Maybe it's a bit of wishful thinking to try and grow one. There's genera others that would well over here.
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Old 11-20-2023, 01:11 PM
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You will run into trouble giving enough sun with too much heat. Many don't do well in your kind of summers. Read and choose more warmth-tolerant species.
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Old 11-20-2023, 01:13 PM
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I would suggest ensifolium and sinense as good indoor plants - they like to grow relatively warm. Actually, indoors all the time might be good... they likely don't like high heat either. They also want rather subdued light. Your Texas sun will turn them to toast really fast.

As far as the mix goes, while the mix from Japan might be optimal, as a beginner, go for "good enough" rather than "perfect", Also that will help you learn how to tweak it to meet your conditions. North Texas is different than Canada. Some suggested ingredients, from a speaker at a local meeting: small bark, pumice, akadama soil, kanuma soil (you play with the proportions) The biggest challenge, generally, is getting good bark - go with Orchiata or equivalent.
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Old 11-20-2023, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by estación seca View Post
You will run into trouble giving enough sun with too much heat. Many don't do well in your kind of summers. Read and choose more warmth-tolerant species.
Yea, the more I read the more I'm thinking having any Jenosa type cymbidiums I get stay indoors is a far better option.

---------- Post added at 02:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:59 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roberta View Post
As far as the mix goes, while the mix from Japan might be optimal, as a beginner, go for "good enough" rather than "perfect", Also that will help you learn how to tweak it to meet your conditions. North Texas is different than Canada. Some suggested ingredients, from a speaker at a local meeting: small bark, pumice, akadama soil, kanuma soil (you play with the proportions) The biggest challenge, generally, is getting good bark - go with Orchiata or equivalent.
I think if I can find a bonsai supply seller I can get the akadama and kanuma. The rest I can find other places online or at nearby nurseries.
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Old 11-20-2023, 02:32 PM
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Originally Posted by alecStewart1 View Post
I think if I can find a bonsai supply seller I can get the akadama and kanuma. The rest I can find other places online or at nearby nurseries.
You can get both akadama and kanuma online from Amazon. That's where I got mine.
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Old 11-20-2023, 04:37 PM
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You can get both akadama and kanuma online from Amazon. That's where I got mine.
I found that the MysteryGardenStore on Etsy also sells a potting mix that includes Kanuma and Satsuma.

They don't specify how much it is for one purchase, though.
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Old 11-20-2023, 04:48 PM
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Looks like a mix of medium-size kanuma, some akadama, and pumice. Don't see bark, maybe it's there. Since all 3 of those inorganics can be used for other things too, why not get the ingredients and mix your own? Pumice also can be obtained on Amazon, or you may be able to find a local source.
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Old 11-20-2023, 04:56 PM
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Fair point.

I think I've seen pumice rock and orchid bark at a local nursery. I do need some orchid bark anyway for when spring comes around, so might as well get it now. Other plants I have prefer mixes that include orchid bark as well. Pumice is useful for the Pinguiculas I have.
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