New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Login
User Name
Password   


Registration is FREE. Click to become a member of OrchidBoard community
(You're NOT logged in)

menu menu

Sponsor
Donate Now
and become
Forum Supporter.

New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Many perks!
<...more...>


Sponsor
 

Google


Fauna Top Sites
LOG IN/REGISTER TO CLOSE THIS ADVERTISEMENT
  #11  
Old 07-31-2020, 12:22 PM
JScott JScott is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Grand Prairie, TX
Posts: 1,016
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by estación seca View Post
You're not a confirmed orchid grower until you start getting rid of furniture for more space.
Well, I think this fall, that time will come lol.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-02-2020, 08:36 AM
SouthPark's Avatar
SouthPark SouthPark is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2018
Member of:AOS
Location: Australia, North Queensland
Posts: 3,884
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JScott View Post
It is my understanding that sudden changes in culture can cause Cymbidium buds to blast.
Quite possible JS. I have read that the group of cyms that require cold weather for decent chances of producing flower spike (not the warm weather spikers) can be known to abort the flower spike - even quite advanced stage spikes.

As for warm weather spikers ----- I definitely wouldn't be surprised if a change of growing conditions causes buds to blast. Will keep an eye and ear out about this.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-02-2020, 10:53 AM
JScott JScott is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Grand Prairie, TX
Posts: 1,016
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthPark View Post
Quite possible JS. I have read that the group of cyms that require cold weather for decent chances of producing flower spike (not the warm weather spikers) can be known to abort the flower spike - even quite advanced stage spikes.

As for warm weather spikers ----- I definitely wouldn't be surprised if a change of growing conditions causes buds to blast. Will keep an eye and ear out about this.
I know that is definitely true of the cool growers. Back in my younger days, I wanted so bad to grow Cymbidiums. I even bought several. They were in full bloom when I bought them, so the flowers were fine. Then they would grow new pseudobulbs, and all would be well. I would leave them outside, and we get the kind of fall weather that they need to spike, so they would start to spike. however, there comes a time when it is too cold to leave them outside any longer, so they had to come in, and when I brought them in, all the buds would blast. This went on for like three years before I finally gave up on them haha.

But I think that has more to do with the fact that Cymbidiums just need cold weather while the buds develop, and the change to warmer conditions caused the buds to blast.

With the warm growing ones, I don't know if moving them from one warm location to another warm location would pose any risk to the spikes, but I'd rather not chance it, and I'd like to keep my growing conditions as close to the ones they came from, and I don't think they came from a place where every day is 95, and the nights are 80, so I chose to keep them inside rather than put them outside. I'm sure if they were accustomed to my outside growing conditions they would be fine, but I think suddenly sticking them out there when it's 95 might make the buds blast, so I'll keep them inside until they bloom. Once they bloom and I repot them, they can go outside and I don't expect any problems.

---------- Post added at 08:53 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:51 AM ----------

The spikes are just starting to grow, they're only two or three inches tall at the moment. I don't know if that makes them more or less susceptible to blast from changing conditions, but I think it would make them less susceptible than they would be if they were farther along.
Reply With Quote
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Likes
Likes SouthPark liked this post
  #14  
Old 08-02-2020, 11:17 AM
Dollythehun's Avatar
Dollythehun Dollythehun is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Aug 2016
Zone: 6a
Location: Northern Indiana
Posts: 5,388
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii Female
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthPark View Post
Quite possible JS. I have read that the group of cyms that require cold weather for decent chances of producing flower spike (not the warm weather spikers) can be known to abort the flower spike - even quite advanced stage spikes.

As for warm weather spikers ----- I definitely wouldn't be surprised if a change of growing conditions causes buds to blast. Will keep an eye and ear out about this.
I have moved them up from the basement and had them blast. It's not cold down there either.
Reply With Quote
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Likes
Likes SouthPark liked this post
  #15  
Old 08-03-2020, 03:32 AM
JScott JScott is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Grand Prairie, TX
Posts: 1,016
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

It's been 5 days, and the spikes are definitely growing well, so I think I'll keep them in the house by my good east window (gets direct sun from about 7 until about 1, Mayb not enough light to grow them there forever, but it should be enough to keep them happy while the buds develop) until after blooming and repotting. They seem happy where they are, so I'm just going to leave them there. And don't cooler temperatures tend to lead to better color on the blooms? I bring a lot of my outside plants inside during the summer while the buds are developing, because I feel like they have better color under the lights than they do when I leave them outside. Especially the Cattleyas seem susceptible to this. The flowers are even larger if I let the buds develop under the lights than if I leave them outside to develop.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-12-2020, 12:36 PM
Orchid Chikk Aussie Land Orchid Chikk Aussie Land is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 59
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

I know we are different Country's
BUT i would put them outside,
In part shade.
As they Need the sun ..

I've seen people here in Aussie Land,
Who have a plant like yours,
Brought it inside, then within days,
All those sweet lil buds fell off
They are outdoor plants.
So just my 2c, not that it's worth much lol
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-12-2020, 01:05 PM
JScott JScott is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Grand Prairie, TX
Posts: 1,016
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Orchid Chikk Aussie Land View Post
I know we are different Country's
BUT i would put them outside,
In part shade.
As they Need the sun ..

I've seen people here in Aussie Land,
Who have a plant like yours,
Brought it inside, then within days,
All those sweet lil buds fell off
They are outdoor plants.
So just my 2c, not that it's worth much lol
You are from Australia, the land of Cymbidiums. I trust your judgement. I will put two of them outside. If the spikes continue to grow and develop, then I will put the other 3 outside.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-12-2020, 03:46 PM
JScott JScott is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Grand Prairie, TX
Posts: 1,016
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

However, once the buds reach a certain size, i will bring the plants back in. I do this with most of my outside plants. I find I get much better color when the buds do their final development in cooler temperatures. I've never lost a flower bud doing this. I think once they get big enough, they are very unlikely to blast. But I feel confident that the flowers will have better color with the buds developing where it is 70 degrees than where it is 95 degrees.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-12-2020, 05:25 PM
DirtyCoconuts DirtyCoconuts is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2019
Zone: 10b
Location: South Florida, East Coast
Posts: 4,004
New Cymbidiums from The Orchid People of Hawaii
Default

i sent them an email for a quote- i tried to stay away from the ones you got so we can swap in a while but i had to get that 'orange 9' !!!! woooooweeeeee hot to look at even
__________________
Hi - All the ways I grow are dictated by the choices I have made and the environment in which I live. Please listen and act accordingly
--------------------------------------------------------------
Rooted in South Florida....

Zone 10b, Baby! Hot and wet
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-12-2020, 06:34 PM
SouthPark's Avatar
SouthPark SouthPark is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Dec 2018
Member of:AOS
Location: Australia, North Queensland
Posts: 3,884
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dollythehun View Post
I have moved them up from the basement and had them blast. It's not cold down there either.
Dolly ------ I think that some environment measurement gear could probably help with comparing what changes there could be - light, temperature, humidity etc --- between the two spots where the orchid was. It's likely that something changed by an adequate amount, leading to the bud blast.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JScott View Post
However, once the buds reach a certain size, i will bring the plants back in. I do this with most of my outside plants. I find I get much better color when the buds do their final development in cooler temperatures. I've never lost a flower bud doing this. I think once they get big enough, they are very unlikely to blast. But I feel confident that the flowers will have better color with the buds developing where it is 70 degrees than where it is 95 degrees.
I have heard/read of spikes at various stages just 'aborting' (that's what they called it) ---- including relatively tall spikes without buds yet, as well as spikes with buds not yet large enough - just 'aborting' due to change in environment.

I think that what you noticed has truth in it ----- as in buds reaching a certain size (beyond a certain stage of development) gets the spike out of the 'danger' zone.

I have definitely seen tall promising spikes (with no buds forming yet) 'abort' - due to change in condition - such as shipped from temperate zone to tropical.

Fortunately, my Cym. Barrita Princess 'Princess' (I have two of them) - both had those late stage buds - and the flowers opened - so nice. The result was reported by growers to be expected - as in beyond a certain stage of bud growth, the chance of going on to flowering stage becomes high ---- or at least much higher than early stages.

Totally convinced that temperate climate cym flowers opening in the tropics - no problem. It's the spike development or spike formation triggering conditions - that's the problem for tropics here.


Last edited by SouthPark; 08-12-2020 at 06:37 PM..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
etsy, orchid, people, plants, pots


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wild orchid in Hawaii Bombotany Identification Forum 4 02-29-2020 03:25 PM
Have you EVER seen orchid list like this??? TOMMYMIAMI Greenhouse Gardening 28 04-06-2014 03:47 PM
We Need More Orchid Celebrities epiphyte78 Advanced Discussion 1 01-03-2014 07:25 AM
Seasoned orchid people, what do you use to get rid of salts on your pots? Katt Advanced Discussion 14 02-09-2008 09:04 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:27 PM.

© 2007 OrchidBoard.com
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.37 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

Clubs vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.