Rooty Brassavola
Login
User Name
Password   


Registration is FREE. Click to become a member of OrchidBoard community
(You're NOT logged in)

menu menu

Sponsor
Donate Now
and become
Forum Supporter.

Rooty Brassavola
Many perks!
<...more...>


Sponsor
 

Google


Fauna Top Sites
LOG IN/REGISTER TO CLOSE THIS ADVERTISEMENT
  #11  
Old 07-31-2018, 05:10 PM
isurus79's Avatar
isurus79 isurus79 is offline
Senior Member
American Orchid Society Judge
 

Join Date: Sep 2007
Zone: 8b
Location: Austin, Texas
Age: 38
Posts: 7,681
Default

Ya, bloom boosters are snake oil. Stick with a balanced fertilizer and feed at reduced rates. Less is more with orchids!

---------- Post added at 04:10 PM ---------- Previous post was at 04:10 PM ----------

But those roots sure look amazing!!
__________________
Steve

For all my pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/isurus79/

Instagram @isurus79
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 07-31-2018, 05:18 PM
dougbraz dougbraz is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: So Paulo, Brazil
Age: 57
Posts: 85
Default

Good to know the roots are looking good at least
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-01-2018, 07:36 AM
Ray's Avatar
Ray Ray is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Oak Island NC
Posts: 9,104
Rooty Brassavola
Default

If you look at the plants' makeup, they're about 95% water. Of the "dry" mass, the vast majority is carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen (obtained from air and water) and nitrogen (obtained from fertilizers we apply). All of the other minerals, combined, make up about 1% of the plants' dry mass.

Orchids are particularly undemanding of fertilizer, because they are so slow-growing, compared to most other plants.

If you do the calculations of the chemical processes going on in plants, to gain 1 kg of mass - maybe 45 or 60 days for corn, a couple of years for a cattleya, a decade for a phal, or a lifetime for a tiny pleuorthallid - they must absorb and process about 200 liters of water, but only 10g of nutrient minerals!

Studies have shown that the "throughfall" and "trunk flow" water reaching epiphytes after cascading through a tropical forest canopy has a mineral content typically below 15 ppm, and the vast majority of that is nitrogen.

K-Lite fertilizer (12-1-1-10Ca-3Mg) was developed to try to mimic that, and my recommendation of using only a little, but using it frequently, is intended to mimic what the plants see in nature.
__________________
Ray Barkalow, Orchid Iconoclast
Want Better Plants? READ THIS
shop.firstrays.com

Free Shipping in the US! (see terms & conditions for details)
Reply With Quote
Post Thanks / Like - 1 Likes
Likes isurus79 liked this post
  #14  
Old 08-01-2018, 08:37 AM
isurus79's Avatar
isurus79 isurus79 is offline
Senior Member
American Orchid Society Judge
 

Join Date: Sep 2007
Zone: 8b
Location: Austin, Texas
Age: 38
Posts: 7,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray View Post
K-Lite fertilizer (12-1-1-10Ca-3Mg) was developed to try to mimic that, and my recommendation of using only a little, but using it frequently, is intended to mimic what the plants see in nature.
Or simply use time release fertilizer which mimics the same process with a tiny fraction of the effort
__________________
Steve

For all my pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/isurus79/

Instagram @isurus79
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-01-2018, 01:07 PM
Ray's Avatar
Ray Ray is offline
Senior Member
 

Join Date: May 2005
Location: Oak Island NC
Posts: 9,104
Rooty Brassavola
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by isurus79 View Post
Or simply use time release fertilizer which mimics the same process with a tiny fraction of the effort
"Time release" fertilizers are actually temperature dependent, not time, and as that varies, it smacks of "less control" to me.

So if I put a teaspoon of "controlled release" fertilizer in my pot, how do I know how much nutrient is actually being released?
__________________
Ray Barkalow, Orchid Iconoclast
Want Better Plants? READ THIS
shop.firstrays.com

Free Shipping in the US! (see terms & conditions for details)
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-01-2018, 02:25 PM
dougbraz dougbraz is offline
Member
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: So Paulo, Brazil
Age: 57
Posts: 85
Default

Thanks everybody for the info!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-01-2018, 03:29 PM
isurus79's Avatar
isurus79 isurus79 is offline
Senior Member
American Orchid Society Judge
 

Join Date: Sep 2007
Zone: 8b
Location: Austin, Texas
Age: 38
Posts: 7,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray View Post
"Time release" fertilizers are actually temperature dependent, not time, and as that varies, it smacks of "less control" to me.

So if I put a teaspoon of "controlled release" fertilizer in my pot, how do I know how much nutrient is actually being released?
I didn't mention control.

However, less fertilizer gets to the roots over an extended period of time than weekly or monthly dosing since a small amount is released with each watering, which is daily for my 100+ degree temps.

Mixing fertilizer using liquids mostly runs out of the pot and onto the ground, so the amount of fertilizer hitting the media is less important than the amount that reaches the roots AND gets absorbed. Therefore, timed (controlled) release is better replication of natural conditions since small dosing occurs with every watering. Its also less work for the grower to "set it and forget it" for a year.

Some controlled release fertilizers are more temperature dependent than others. I understand osmocote melts completely in high temps and nutricote holds together in high heat.
__________________
Steve

For all my pics: http://www.flickr.com/photos/isurus79/

Instagram @isurus79
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
brassavola, growing, leaves, roots, sun


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
brassavola jimminy cricket vs brassavola martiana gravotrope Cattleya Alliance 3 12-16-2014 02:30 PM
Brassavola perrinii Luis Renato Cattleya Alliance 10 12-07-2014 12:43 PM
Summer project 2012- Plant suggestions camille1585 Member Projects 127 04-18-2013 02:50 AM
Brassavola 'Jiminy Cricket' (and its fragrant blooms) Bud Cattleya Alliance 12 11-13-2011 09:20 PM
Brassavola perrinii isurus79 Cattleya Alliance 8 05-31-2009 12:19 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:51 AM.

© 2007 OrchidBoard.com
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO v2.0.37 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

Clubs vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.