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  #1  
Old 12-05-2019, 09:44 PM
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Fairorchids Fairorchids is offline
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Default 1st bloom seedling

Got this plant from Alan Koch (Gold Coast Orchids) about a year ago. Interesting flower, with saturated pink color, good substance. I have 2 more, one BS and what about a year away.

Couldn't help myself, so I drilled down into the family tree. This little Catt has a lot of different species in the background.
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1st bloom seedling-20191203_114415-2-jpg   1st bloom seedling-sierra-doll-kiritsubo-jpg  
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Kim (Fair Orchids)

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  #2  
Old 12-05-2019, 10:28 PM
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Wonderful! The colour transition is very nice.

Is the flower fully open? If the left petal is stuck there, then just grab one of these things ... click here to gently prop the petal up (for a day or so), until it 'sets'.

The helping hands can even be used to bring the lower sepals back down a bit ..... keep in place (for a day or two) until they become fixed in place as well. That is, to undo the reflexing.

If the left petal is still opening, then cancel that idea hahaha.

Last edited by SouthPark; 12-05-2019 at 10:32 PM..
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Old 12-05-2019, 11:48 PM
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It does look slightly asymetrical. It will be interesting to see the other siblings and compare.
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Old 12-06-2019, 07:59 AM
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It is fully open in the photo.

Photo is taken with my cell phone, so not perfectly straight on. Actually, petals are fairly symmetrical, but the lower left sepal is slightly crooked in this blooming. I will keep it to bloom again.

Plant is fairly large (growing in 3 or 4 directions), so I can probably divide it when it is due for repotting in about a year.
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Founder of SPCOP (Society to Prevention of Cruelty to Orchid People), with the goal of barring the taxonomists from tinkering with established genera!

I am neither a 'lumper' nor a 'splitter', but I refuse to re-write millions of labels.
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Old 12-06-2019, 10:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairorchids View Post
but the lower left sepal is slightly crooked in this blooming.
I came up with the idea of undivine intervention, and wouldn't be surprised that other people do it too hehehe.

If a petal hasn't opened all the way out, then maybe - just maybe - it's possible to use a device with an artificial little finger to gently hold the petal in a particular position - for a day or so, and then see what happens after the 'finger' is released. This might work nicely for a fairly newly opened flower. When the finger is released - there might be a chance that the petal will remain permanently in place.

Same idea for reflexed/curled-back sepals.

I recently successfully used a 'helping hands' device to correct the angle of a front-lobe of a catt-type flower - with extremely nice results.

The flower was still new and fresh, and correcting the angle of the front-lobe by holding the lobe in place (gently with a finger of the device) was like waiting for a butterfly wing to harden, or hair spray to set.

I guess that theoretically, a person could use their fingers to hold up the flower part (in place) for a day. But obviously that would be impractical - so this is where the helping hands device can help out.

I don't usually need to do things like this. But figured that it was something interesting to try. But - once again, wouldn't be surprised if some people do just that - for aesthetics hehe.


Last edited by SouthPark; 12-06-2019 at 10:39 AM..
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  #6  
Old 12-06-2019, 10:52 AM
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Fairorchids Fairorchids is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthPark View Post
I came up with the idea of undivine intervention, and wouldn't be surprised that other people do it too hehehe.

If a petal hasn't opened all the way out, then maybe - just maybe - it's possible to use a device with an artificial little finger to gently hold the petal in a particular position - for a day or so, and then see what happens after the 'finger' is released. This might work nicely for a fairly newly opened flower. When the finger is released - there might be a chance that the petal will remain permanently in place.

Same idea for reflexed/curled-back sepals.

I recently successfully used a 'helping hands' device to correct the angle of a front-lobe of a catt-type flower - with extremely nice results.

The flower was still new and fresh, and correcting the angle of the front-lobe by holding the lobe in place (gently with a finger of the device) was like waiting for a butterfly wing to harden, or hair spray to set.

I guess that theoretically, a person could use their fingers to hold up the flower part (in place) for a day. But obviously that would be impractical - so this is where the helping hands device can help out.

I don't usually need to do things like this. But figured that it was something interesting to try. But - once again, wouldn't be surprised if some people do just that - for aesthetics hehe.

I know people who use Q-Tips (to avoid causing pressure point marks on the flowers).

However, I generally do not try to enhance the flowers. I want to see what the plant does naturally, so I can judge whether it is worth using as a breeder.
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I am neither a 'lumper' nor a 'splitter', but I refuse to re-write millions of labels.
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  #7  
Old 12-06-2019, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fairorchids View Post
I know people who use Q-Tips (to avoid causing pressure point marks on the flowers).

However, I generally do not try to enhance the flowers. I want to see what the plant does naturally, so I can judge whether it is worth using as a breeder.
Thanks for letting me know about the Q-tips. The metal clips of the helping hands probably don't cause pressure points. It's just like using our finger to gently prop-up the petal a bit. But definitely nice to know about the Q-tips! May come in handy.

The flower that I had manually 'adjusted' slightly recently had opened fantastically - naturally - for the previous flowering (not the most recent flowering). I think that sometimes - how a flower ends up depends on environmental conditions. I grow my orchids outdoors (semi-outdoors) - so depending on whether it's windy or dry etc ----- I think it can affect how the opening flower ends up (in shape) - aside from other factors. So a touch-up or tidy-up may be nice sometimes (for aesthetic purposes) hahaha.

I personally don't mind if a flower doesn't open to 'text book' level.


Last edited by SouthPark; 12-06-2019 at 09:55 PM..
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