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  #21  
Old 04-04-2016, 08:15 PM
jwarren82101 jwarren82101 is offline
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Default Pots for Catts.

You could always take up a pottery or ceramics class and make whatever size pot you desire.
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  #22  
Old 10-09-2016, 05:54 PM
Marlena Marlena is offline
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Default Bulb pans

Try getting some from Holland, but really if you ask for bulb or Azalea pans at a garden center, you might find some.
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  #23  
Old 01-08-2020, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by bil View Post
with depth comes an increased risk of root rot.
Fear not bil. It's a matter of compensation. I have some catts potted in quite deep plastic pots. A bit of media wastage on my part - but no issues. If the media is airy enough ... such as using suitably large sized scoria pieces (which is what I choose to use), and if air flow is good through a good drainage pot, then everything will be great - provided temperature is good too.

Another thing I do is to use relatively large diameter scoria pieces at the bottom of the pot. Eg. fill the bottom quarter or third of the pot with big pieces of media. This can help with airing.
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  #24  
Old 01-09-2020, 06:21 AM
DirtyCoconuts DirtyCoconuts is offline
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SP, I do that too, the larger piece at the bottom.

I donít really understand why, lol. Is it because they would theoretically have larger spaces between them and thus more air? Itís one of things Iíve always done, never really confirmed lol
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  #25  
Old 01-09-2020, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by DirtyCoconuts View Post
SP, I do that too, the larger piece at the bottom.

I donít really understand why, lol. Is it because they would theoretically have larger spaces between them and thus more air? Itís one of things Iíve always done, never really confirmed lol
DC ----- extremely nice to hear that you do that too! I did that due to observations - as in watering pots with relatively small diameter scoria pieces, and later inspecting the scoria inside the pot by digging down and removing scoria --- just to see how wet it would be after a while.

I noticed that when scoria pieces are relatively small, and we fill up a relatively large pot with it, then the scoria in the pot (such as at in the middle of the pot) can get quite wet. A slurry kind of wet. I was guessing that air-flow through the media could possibly be reduced or even stopped when in this particular wet slurry-type state for long times.

I figured that it might be necessary to set up a thick enough layer of scoria at the bottom of the pot to help with airing and drainage.

This definitely aligns with your interpretation of the situation - bigger pieces of irregular shape media - should allow for larger gaps for air to get through.
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  #26  
Old 01-09-2020, 01:47 PM
DirtyCoconuts DirtyCoconuts is offline
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excellent! I appreciate you sharing that experiment as i have just never thought to confirm it.

i even do it for my terrestrial plants in dirt...always a few big rocks at the bottom of the pot to keep things from getting stagnant
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  #27  
Old 01-30-2020, 05:12 AM
mkallen81 mkallen81 is offline
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ok so reading this thread, and as a new comer to cats. I am wondering why you don't put air holes in your plastic pots so the air moves freely?

just a question because i don't know. Is this bad for catts?

thanks! melannie

---------- Post added at 11:12 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:05 AM ----------

Hi so i have just read through this thread, and i don't really understand why there is so much worry about root rot with catts. i understood that they are terrestrial orchids and thus could even be grown in potting soil. Do they need all that much air around their roots?

Sorry if this is a stupid question but I am new to orchids and new to the catts i particuliar as i just bought my first one! I just love her though she is gorgeous and a beast! i hope i can keep her alive and make her flower again.

Thanks!

Melannie
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  #28  
Old 01-30-2020, 02:47 PM
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ok so reading this thread, and as a new comer to cats. I am wondering why you don't put air holes in your plastic pots so the air moves freely?
This is indeed done by some growers. It certainly will allow air to get into the pot more in a growing area having good air-flow. One consideration could be - whether roots eventually grow out of the holes - possibly making it hard when (if) it comes to repot time.

Quote:
Hi so i have just read through this thread, and i don't really understand why there is so much worry about root rot with catts. i understood that they are terrestrial orchids and thus could even be grown in potting soil. Do they need all that much air around their roots?
Cattleya type orchids are not considered to be terrestrial orchids. They don't normally grow in soil. Under certain suitable conditions, it wouldn't be surprising that at least some cattleya orchids could grow purely in fairly fast draining sand.

One of the important aims is to prevent the roots from getting starved of oxygen. Roots need oxygen to survive. And the roots also need enough water to get into the roots in order for both roots and orchid to survive. Adequately oxygenated water provides roots with the needed oxygen.

Growing purely bare root orchids without watering won't work well with every grower - as survival would then depend on the suitability of the environment. So growers usually need to have some input with watering.

An airy enough growing medium that retains some water (after watering) in a pot that has both good drainage and adequate number and size of holes (such as at the bottom of the pot) helps to avoid water stagnation in the pot - especially when the orchid is grown in an area where air doesn't move much (or at all), and still-air environments can invite certain unwanted fungal growth.

When media (eg. spaghnum) is used that can get waterlogged/saturated and can potentially lead to stagnant regions inside a pot (and causing roots to be starved of oxygen), then it will be up to the grower to choose (if they can) a watering method that avoids root suffocation. This could involve choosing a suitable amount of water to add, and knowing how long to wait between watering.

It's all about control.

If the grower knows what needs to be controlled to keep orchids healthy in general, and if they can keep important quantities (suitable growing temperature, suitable light level and light duration, water intake for orchid, adequate oxygen intake into roots, adequate nutrient supplement intake, adequate moving air-flow around entire plant - leaves, stem, media, roots and all) under control all of the time, then that gives the orchids excellent chances of staying healthy.

Where things can go bad is - for example - cold climate countries, where the orchid might not have suitable systems in place for staying healthy when it gets too cold, and lighting level and lighting duration gets low. Or when air is still for a long time, and possible fungal/bacterial activity starts up. This is all assuming that the plants already get adequate supplements (fertiliser etc).


Last edited by SouthPark; 01-30-2020 at 03:45 PM..
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  #29  
Old 01-30-2020, 03:27 PM
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Roberta Roberta is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkallen81 View Post
[/COLOR]Hi so i have just read through this thread, and i don't really understand why there is so much worry about root rot with catts. i understood that they are terrestrial orchids and thus could even be grown in potting soil. Do they need all that much air around their roots?

Sorry if this is a stupid question but I am new to orchids and new to the catts i particuliar as i just bought my first one! I just love her though she is gorgeous and a beast! i hope i can keep her alive and make her flower again.

Thanks!

Melannie
First of all, there are NO stupid questions (except the ones that don't get asked) There is so much about orchids that is different from other plants!

Cattleyas not only don't generally grow terrestrially, they are among the very dominantly epiphytic orchids. My own experience with these is, the less medium the better (with high humidity and lots of watering, they are happiest mounted) For my own plants, I have found that in many cases they grow slowly until they reach edge of the pot, once they outgrow the pot they grow much faster. (That tells me that they really didn't want to be in a pot) More and more, I use baskets with large bark. (Volcanic rock works well here too) It is a compromise between what the plant would REALLY like and what I have to do to give it adequate moisture in my less-than-ideal environment. So... they need excellent drainage, and a wet-dry cycle. If, when you water, you water thoroughly, letting the pot drain, you pull air into the root zone (very important) while flushing out salts from fertilizer and the water itself, and other junk.
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  #30  
Old 01-30-2020, 07:38 PM
Fran20 Fran20 is offline
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Originally Posted by SouthPark View Post
Another thing I do is to use relatively large diameter scoria pieces at the bottom of the pot. Eg. fill the bottom quarter or third of the pot with big pieces of media. This can help with airing.
How large is the diameter of scoria pieces that you use at the bottom of the pot?
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