Login
User Name
Password   


Registration is FREE. Click to become a member of OrchidBoard community
(You're NOT logged in)

menu menu

Sponsor
Donate Now
and become
Forum Supporter.


Many perks!
<...more...>


Sponsor
 

Google


Fauna Top Sites
Register Members O.C.D. Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
LOG IN/REGISTER TO CLOSE THIS ADVERTISEMENT
Go Back   Orchid Board - Most Complete Orchid Forum on the web ! > ORCHID DISCUSSIONS > Advanced Discussion
Like Tree12Likes

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
  #21  
Unread 07-22-2012, 10:29 PM
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Mar 2012
Zone: 8b
Location: Camano Island Washington
Age: 31
Posts: 1,091
Female
Default

Island Girl- People do add crushed oyster shell to their orchids. Read Ray's post above.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Unread 07-23-2012, 02:24 AM
King_of_orchid_growing:)'s Avatar
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Apr 2008
Zone: 9a
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 7,982
Default

Limestone rocks, dolomite, crushed egg shells powdered calcium, fertilizers with calcium, calcium citrate pills (yes, the ones you take as vitamins) - they all work. I'd be careful about the dosage with the calcium citrate pills though, they dissolve pretty quickly and is pretty bioavailable.


I would not try growing orchids that are naturally found on granite with calcareous rocks. Too risky. Granite usually has a slightly acidic pH.
Edward Brookes likes this.
__________________
Philip

Last edited by King_of_orchid_growing:); 07-23-2012 at 02:28 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Unread 08-12-2012, 07:32 PM
Jr. Member
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 13
Default

Hi.

I do like my rupicolous Laelia's. I only have one right now but have grown a few. The species i have is Laelia fournieri and i grow in in limestone chunks, fine aquarium gravel and with a tiny layer of moss on top.

The rupicolous Laelia grow a little different to most other rock growing plants. They require very very high light levels in general to get flowers, basically full sun morning til night and they get most of their water from spending time in cloud cover, due to how high they grow up in the mountains in Brazil. Though a benefit of them being from such high altitudes is that they can take low temps.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Unread 08-12-2012, 10:10 PM
james mickelso's Avatar
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oceanside, Ca
Age: 65
Posts: 3,463
Male
Default

In Vietnam there are paphs that grow only on limestone. Also Laelias grow in the gran sabana in Venesuala I think. I have grown lealias and BLC's on rock before and use lava rock as a potting media a lot. I have a couiple very nice vertically oriented lava bombs that I will plant some Catts and laelias on soon. Most epiphytes don't care what they are grown on as long as they get three squares a day.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Unread 08-13-2012, 07:24 PM
Jr. Member
 

Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 13
Default

Oh, i forgot to mention Epidendrum goodspeedianum Another favourite rock growing plant of mine and it can get a little bit big... canes can get up to around 7ft long
kindrag23 likes this.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Unread 08-14-2012, 09:41 PM
Leisurely's Avatar
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Zone: 9b
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,989
Default

Stabilizing the plants on a rock could be easily accomplished by simply drilling a few small holes in the rock and inserting metal rods to which the plants can be secured by ties. A little sphagnum moss around the roots might be beneficial.
__________________
Jerry
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Unread 10-17-2013, 11:21 PM
blackvine's Avatar
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Zone: 6a
Location: Des Plaines, IL
Age: 55
Posts: 224
Female
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray View Post
Be very careful with calcium additions.

Yes, some lithophytes grow on limestone, but they may not necessarily be ON the limestone, but in the detritus and leaf litter in the cracks in the limestone.

Such natural limestone deposits are very slow to dissolve, so while they do release the calcium into the root environment, it is a very low dosage, and doesn't boost the pH enough to overwhelm the acidity of decomposing vegetation. If you use a water-soluble additive, I think you'll be pushing it too far. You're much better off with a fertilizer containing the calcium and magnesium (they work better together) or top-dressing with slow-to-dissolve stuff like dolomite or crushed oyster shell.
Ray, does this apply to those with hard water supply? I'm in the Chicago suburbs and our water - I think - has all the minerals needed for orchids, including calcium and magnesium. I want to grow some of my orchids on rocks in a terrarium. Not a clue what these rocks are - they're just porous and pretty. I don't think I need to supplement with anything special, other than my weekly/weakly dose of regular orchid fert (from Hausermanns) . . . or, do I?
Edward Brookes likes this.

Last edited by blackvine; 10-17-2013 at 11:26 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Unread 10-27-2013, 04:44 PM
Member
 

Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 43
Default

I have Dendrobium kingianum thriving on a weathered granite boulder. The plant is far healthier than the others of this type which I have as epiphytes on trees, in pots & teak baskets. I know this species is as tough as they come, but on the rock, it is way stronger than the others. Does anybody think dried, crushed eggshell would be benificial to orchids as a fertilizer, source of calcium or just an old wives' tale?
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Unread 10-27-2013, 09:55 PM
blackvine's Avatar
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Oct 2012
Zone: 6a
Location: Des Plaines, IL
Age: 55
Posts: 224
Female
Default

Edward, old wives tales frequently turn out to be true. Yes, eggshells contain calcium and could be used as a top coat for calcium-needing plants. I know that just from gardening!
kindrag23 and Edward Brookes like this.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Unread 10-27-2013, 10:08 PM
kindrag23's Avatar
Senior Member
 

Join Date: Jul 2013
Zone: 8a
Location: Texas
Age: 25
Posts: 2,858
Female
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by blackvine View Post
Edward, old wives tales frequently turn out to be true. Yes, eggshells contain calcium and could be used as a top coat for calcium-needing plants. I know that just from gardening!
Interesting I will have to remember this.

---------- Post added at 09:08 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:03 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Green View Post
Oh, i forgot to mention Epidendrum goodspeedianum Another favourite rock growing plant of mine and it can get a little bit big... canes can get up to around 7ft long
Wow I love Epidendrum they are quickly becoming a favorite of mine, but I feel my bifalce and gramm. Wallissii will be taking up all my space.

Love this thread though very interesting information.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:14 AM.

© 2007 OrchidBoard.com

Clubs, ShowCase vBulletin Plugins by Drive Thru Online, Inc.

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0